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コンサート音楽の聞き方
How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition

定価(円)
: ¥
商品番号 :
カタログ# : TC700
カテゴリー : 音楽
: 0
: 0000
監督 : Robert Greenberg: UC Berkeley Ph.D
俳優 :
制作国 : USA
CC :
販社 : Teaching Company
字幕 : undefined
言語 :
ディスク : 12
リージョン : ALL
数量   EA
Details

This course can permanently enrich your life: With Professor Greenberg as your teacher, you will hear and understand an entire language of unmatched beauty, genius, and power.
Why Is Concert Music so Powerful?
How can concert music—once it is understood—so move our lives? Professor Greenberg explains in his introductory lecture: "Music, the most abstract and sublime of all the arts, is capable of transmitting an unbelievable amount of expressive, historical, and even philosophical information to us, provided that our antennas are up and pointed in the right direction. A little education goes a long way to vitalizing and rendering relevant a body of music that many feel is beyond their grasp.
"And why is an understanding of concert music worthwhile? I would suggest a few reasons:
“The skills one brings to listening to music—imagination; abstract, nonconcrete thinking; intuition; and instinctive reaction and trusting those instincts—have gone uncultivated in our educational system and culture for too long.
“Music, as a universal, nonverbal language, allows us to tap into the social, cultural, and aesthetic traditions of different cultures and historical eras. We become more aware of our shared humanity and the wisdom and vision of others.
“Music allows us to transcend our own world and partake in utterly different realities.
“Last, but certainly not least, good music is fun to listen to, relatively inexpensive—we can do it by ourselves or with others—and there are any number of ways to expand our knowledge and appreciation of the art."

48 Lectures
  • 1
    Music as a Mirror
  • 2
    Sources—The Ancient World and the Early Church
  • 3
    The Middle Ages
  • 4
    Introduction to the Renaissance
  • 5
    The Renaissance Mass
  • 6
    The Madrigal
  • 7
    An Introduction to the Baroque Era
  • 8
    Style Features of Baroque-era Music
  • 9
    National Styles—Italy and Germany
  • 10
    Fugue
  • 11
    Baroque Opera, Part 1
  • 12
    Baroque Opera, Part 2
  • 13
    The Oratorio
  • 14
    The Lutheran Church Cantata
  • 15
    Passacaglia
  • 16
    Ritornello Form and the Baroque Concerto
  • 17
    The Enlightenment and an Introduction to the Classical Era
  • 18
    The Viennese Classical Style, Homophony, and the Cadence
  • 19
    Classical-era Form—Theme and Variations
  • 20
    Classical-era Form—Minuet and Trio: Baroque Antecedents
  • 21
    Classical-era Form—Minuet and Trio Form
  • 22
    Classical-era Form—Rondo Form
  • 23
    Classical-era Form—Sonata Form, Part 1
  • 24
    Classical-era Form—Sonata Form, Part 2
  • 25
    Classical-era Form—Sonata Form, Part 3
  • 26
    The Symphony—Music for Every Person
  • 27
    The Solo Concerto
  • 28
    Classical-era Opera—The Rise of Opera Buffa
  • 29
    Classical-era Opera, Part 2—Mozart and the Operatic Ensemble
  • 30
    The French Revolution and an Introduction to Beethoven
  • 31
    Beethoven's Symphony no. 5 in C Minor, op. 67, Part 1
  • 32
    Beethoven's Symphony no. 5 in C Minor, op. 67, Part 2
  • 33
    Introduction to Romanticism
  • 34
    Formal Challenges and Solutions in Early Romantic Music
  • 35
    The Program Symphony—Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique, Part 1
  • 36
    The Program Symphony—Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique, Part 2
  • 37
    19th-Century Italian Opera—Bel Canto Opera
  • 38
    19th-Century Italian Opera—Giuseppe Verdi
  • 39
    19th-Century German Opera—Nationalism and Experimentation
  • 40
    19th-Century German Opera—Richard Wagner
  • 41
    The Concert Overture, Part 1
  • 42
    The Concert Overture, Part 2
  • 43
    Romantic-era Musical Nationalism
  • 44
    Russian Nationalism
  • 45
    An Introduction to Early 20th-Century Modernism
  • 46
    Early 20th-Century Modernism—Claude Debussy
  • 47
    Early 20th-Century Modernism—Igor Stravinsky
  • 48
    Early 20th-Century Modernism—Arnold Schönberg

 

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